Pathology > Gynecologic > Uterine Corpus > Infections
Objectives Anat & Hist Physiologic Cond. Infections Benign Cond. Benign Neoplasms Premalignant Cond. Malignant Neoplasms

III. Infections

Objectives:

After completing this section you will be able to:

  • list common infectious diseases of the endometrium
  • specify etiologic agent and mode of diagnosis
  • describe clinical presentation
  • recognize diagnostic histologic features of endometrial inflammation

  1. Acute endometritis

This usually occurs after an abortion either spontaneous or induced, pregnancy or medical instrumentation. The organisms involved include Staphylococci, Streptococci, N. gonorrhoeae, gram-negative bacilli and occasionally fungi and viruses.

The findings in most cases are non-specific, as they do not usually point to a specific agent.

  1. Chronic endometritis

Chronic endometritis is associated with IUD use, PID, and retained products of conception following an abortion or delivery. The etiologic agent is often not apparent and the patient is said to have non-specific chronic endometritis. About half of these cases have C. trachomatis or N. gonorrhoeae infection. Other causative organisms include Mycoplasma.

Patients present with irregular bleeding.

Histologically, the presence of plasma cells in the endometrium is diagnostic. Maturation of the endometrium is irregular making histologic dating difficult. The stromal cells become spindled and swirl around the glands.


Chronic endometritis.

Objectives Anat & Hist Physiologic Cond. Infections Benign Cond. Benign Neoplasms Premalignant Cond. Malignant Neoplasms